shopper approved
    1504.95
    -3.20
    17.22
    -0.06
    857.65
    1.45
    1474.25
    -22.30

    1951 Franklin Half Dollar

    The Franklin Half Dollar is a widely recognized and popular U.S. coin minted from 1948-1963. The 1951 Franklin Half Dollar has been circulated for over half a century now and given the coin’s age, many of those available today are not in perfect condition. These coins remain quite popular, however, among collectors for several reasons. Franklin Half Dollars can, however, still be bought and sold in brilliant, uncirculated condition. Coins in this condition appear to be brand new and may carry significantly higher premiums because of their excellent condition.

    While Franklin Half Dollars are not considered rare, some editions and types may have higher premiums than others.

    Grading the 1951 Franklin Half Dollar

    The coin grading process is subjective and rigorous. The coin’s surfaces, edges, details and authenticity are all thoroughly checked and verified. In the end, however, a coin’s final grade is determined by a team of expert numismatists that have thoroughly inspected the coin from top to bottom. Coins receiving a grade of extremely fine condition may be considerably more valuable than comparable coins graded good or fine. By having your coin graded, you may increase the coin’s value. You can put your own coins through many of the grading steps yourself. By closely examining your coin’s condition, including details and color, you may be able to get a good idea of how your coin might be graded.

    Use the specifications below to determine how your Franklin Half Dollar coin might be graded.

    Uncirculated: A coin that is said to be in uncirculated condition will look as if it was just struck today and has not been handled by human hands. These coins are considered to be in near-perfect condition, and may carry higher premiums than coins with lower grades. All text and imagery are robust and show no wearing or erosion. The coin’s color and finish may also appear to be new. You can use a magnifying glass to examine your own half dollars. Look closely at the coin for any scratches, erosion or color imperfections.

    Extremely Fine: Coins that are in extremely fine condition may exhibit some scratches or damage on their surfaces or edges. Coins in this condition may also have a slightly smoother feel while holding them, and there may be some slight imperfections in the coin’s color. Nevertheless, coins in this condition are still very visually stunning, and appear to the eye to be in almost perfection condition. Due to their excellent overall condition, these coins may be extremely valuable.

    Fine: A coin that is in fine condition will have some obvious and clear signs of age-related damage. The coin’s surfaces and details may be worn down or smooth, and the coin’s color and finish may be dull or slightly discolored.

    Good: A coin in good condition may have very significant damage to the coin’s surfaces and detail. This damage may make it difficult to identify the coin or any text on the obverse or reverse. In addition, the coin’s color may appear different, and the coin may have a smoother surface from erosion. Despite all of these imperfections, coins in good condition can still be extremely valuable if they are rare or of certain types or mint years.

    1951 Franklin Half Dollar Pricing

    Franklin Half Dollars, regardless of mint year, are fairly easy to purchase. A 1951 edition half dollar may trade for about $13 in very fine condition while a coin in extremely fine condition may trade for about $14. Prices may rise from this level according to the coin’s grade and condition.

    1951 Franklin Half Dollar

    DATE GOOD FINE EXTREMELY FINE UNCIRCULATED
    1951 Franklin Half Dollar N/A N/A $14 N/A
    1951 Franklin Half Dollar (D) N/A N/A $14 N/A
    1951 Franklin Half Dollar (S) N/A N/A $14 N/A
    Source: Red Book

    All Market Updates are provided as a third party analysis and do not necessarily reflect the explicit views of JM Bullion Inc. and should not be construed as financial advice.