shopper approved
    1909.46
    -22.32
    24.69
    -0.51
    891.82
    -7.71
    2456.9
    -22.56

    1865 Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coin

    The 1865 Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coins were struck at the Philadelphia and San Francisco (S) mints with the San Francisco Mint producing much more gold coinage than the Philadelphia minting facility. This may not come as much of a surprise to those who remember that the Gold Rush centered much of the nation’s gold mining activity in the vicinity of the City by the Bay. By this time, the bulk of the U.S. gold coinage was circulating in the West.

    Christian Gobrecht designed the 1865 Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coin which consisted of 90 percent gold and 10 percent copper. They also weigh 4.18 grams and measure 18 millimeters in diameter, meaning they are about the same size as a modern U.S. dime. The Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coin contain a total of 0.1202 ounces of gold.

    Grading the 1865 Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coin

    For coins that have been around for any period of time, you have to take a good, hard look at the coin’s condition. While these coins may have some collectability value even if in poor condition, collectors most often want coins that are in excellent overall condition. Finding such coins can be challenging, however, as many of them have been used in circulation over the years.

    When you are looking at a coin’s condition, you are really trying to determine how that coin may be graded. While a coin’s actual grade must be assigned by a recognized grading company, you can use the guidelines below to get a good idea of what a graded Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coin may look like according to grade.

    Uncirculated: Collectors are often trying to get their hands on coins in this condition. These coins were never used in circulation, and therefore have maintained much of their original condition throughout the years. Looking at coins in this condition, you may even assume that they were just minted that same day.

    Extremely Fine: Just below uncirculated grade, extremely fine coins are also coveted by coin collectors. Coins given this grade may have very minor wear and tear or surface damage and will appear to be in near-pristine condition. Only under close examination might you see the coin’s imperfections.

    Fine: Coins that have been assigned a grade of fine have often been circulated for many years. These coins will display surface damage, including scratches and or dents. The integrity of the coin’s images and engravings usually remains intact, however.

    Good: Good is the grade assigned to the majority of Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coins on the open market today. These coins have been widely used in circulation for some time, and show their age. Scratches, surface damage and blemishes are likely present. Coin collectors often steer clear of these coins in favor of coins in better condition. Coins graded good may still be valuable, however, based on type, mint year and relative scarcity.

    Pricing the 1865 Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coin

    When trying to price a coin, you have to consider both the coin type and the coin’s condition. Many Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coins, for example, were minted in different types for different mint years. Mint year 1865, for example, saw two different types of this coin produced. In addition to the coin type, you will also need to accurately assess the coin’s condition. Condition is very important for coin collectors, and coins in great condition can fetch much higher premiums than similar coins in a lesser condition. Use the grid below to get an idea of what you might expect to pay for a 1865 Liberty Head $2.50 Gold Coinss according to its condition and type.

    Liberty Head $2.5 Gold Coin

    DATE GOOD FINE EXTREMELY FINE UNCIRCULATED
    1865 Liberty Head $2.5 Gold Coin N/A N/A $8,500 $20,000
    1865 Liberty Head $2.5 Gold Coin (S) N/A N/A $650 $1,250
    Source: Red Book

    All Market Updates are provided as a third party analysis and do not necessarily reflect the explicit views of JM Bullion Inc. and should not be construed as financial advice.