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    1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin

    The 1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin is more common and a bit easier to find compared to other pre- 1934 US coinage. Bela Lyon Pratt was the designer of the Indian Head $5 Gold Coin, which was the first con to feature an incuse design (meaning the design was minted into the coin, not raised above). Much of the public detested the incuse design, which some thought would harbor germs.

    These coins are no longer being produced today, but they have a place in the heart of collectors everywhere and are constantly being sought out by people both at home and abroad. Though everyone is looking for these coins in excellent condition, the truth of the matter is that only very few have been maintained in such a state.

    Grading the 1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin

    Whenever a collector considers the purchase of a coin that is more than 100 years old, the first thing he or she will do is carefully analyze the surfaces of the coin. This close analysis is necessary because it is the only way one can find out just what type of condition the coin is in. Because these coins are so old, it is impossible to guarantee the condition.

    Under normal circumstances, a 1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin that is having its condition questioned will be sent away for grading at the hands of a professional organization. Understanding that not everyone has the time and money to send their coins away for grading, we have provided below an outline of the different popular coin grades as well as their associated characteristics.

    Uncirculated: A coin that is determined to be Uncirculated is one that spent almost no time at all in circulation. These coins have retained all of their original texture and will even have the luster that was applied at the time of minting. All in all, these coins are the best of the best and are in absolutely perfect shape.

    Extremely Fine: An Extremely Fine coin is one that has spent only a very limited period of time in circulation. Though they may appear to be in perfect shape, the reality is that under close inspection you will be able to make out some light scratching and other light signs of wear. For collectors, these coins are often a nice, cheaper alternative to Uncirculated editions.

    Fine: Fine is a middle of the road grade given to coins that have been circulated, but through that circulation have not incurred a lot of damage. You will notice that the texture of the coin will have been worn down a bit due to the changing of hands over the years, and you will also notice some light consistent scratching on the surfaces of the coin.

    Good: If the coin in question was given a Good grade, this means that the coin was circulated very heavily and for an extended period of time. Scratching and chipping are two unavoidable qualities of coins of this grade as well. All in all, collectors may not think of Good coins as the first ones they want to add to a collection, but they are still a great addition to any complete collection despite their poor condition.

    Pricing the 1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin

    Determining a price for the 1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin is as easy as taking into consideration a few different factors. For one, because there were multiple types of these coins minted every year, the scarcity associated with the exact type of Morgan you own will play into the asking price. Secondly, because collectors care so much about condition it only follows that the condition of the coin will also play into the asking price. Below is a chart aimed at giving you a better idea of what you might be asked to pay for an 1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin given its condition and type.

    Indian Head $5 Gold Coin

    DATE GOOD FINE EXTREMELY FINE UNCIRCULATED
    1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin N/A N/A $450 $460
    1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin (D) N/A N/A $450 $460
    1910 Indian Head $5 Gold Coin (S) N/A N/A $500 $525
    Source: Red Book

    All Market Updates are provided as a third party analysis and do not necessarily reflect the explicit views of JM Bullion Inc. and should not be construed as financial advice.